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Month: February 2018

Parent Support: A Story

Posted on in Information for Parents

PASAGE

Saint John

Parent support: A story

We have a 20 year old, adopted son Joe. Joe was placed with us under a court order at age 3 because of an extremely abusive relationship in his home. However, after nine months, his mother managed to regain full custody and the abuse continued. When Joe was 4, his mother had another baby and decided that she could no longer keep Joe and would allow us to adopt him.

We enrolled Joe in school and provided him medical and mental health attention. He was diagnosed with hyperactivity and given appropriate medication. He also started counseling with a pediatric psychiatrist. Things went pretty smoothly through grade school.

However, when Joe started Jr. High School he would no longer take his medication. We tried new counseling sessions and even started new schools, but by the time Joe was 14 we had pretty much lost control. Joe has a difficult time telling right from wrong. Finally he was put in foster care with home visitation, which proved to be very stressful. By 16, foster care was terminated and Joe was on his own. He has been homeless for periods of time since then.

The last four years have been tough for Joe, but also for us. After several years of therapy my husband and I found a “Family of SafePeers”. We meet on Monday evenings to share the struggles of trying to be the best parents we can. We listen, we talk, we express our emotions and we even may cry, but no one EVER criticizes our efforts. We have attended workshops and other recovery programs and work to remember that we are important too and that we must take care of ourselves. We love Joe but he has to be responsible for himself now. We have done the best that we can do for him and that is all anyone (including ourselves) can ask from us.

At the present time, Joe has made some inappropriate choices, after going through a 28 day Recovery Program at Ridgewood and a six-week program with the John Howard Society, he finds himself incarcerated. We as parents continue to attend Parent Support Groups on Monday nights, where we continue to receive emotional support from other parents. We are also continuing to attend Parenting workshops sponsored by PASAGE and are learning new skills daily which help us support Joe and also help us to keep ourselves emotionally strong.

Kids, Drugs and Booze

Posted on in Information for Parents

PASAGE

Saint John

Kids, drugs, and booze

Your goal as a parent is to prevent use of drugs. Written here is the information needed to fight today’s drug problem. This will help parents recognize the signs that might mean their kids are getting into illegal drugs.

  • Learn about Drugs – Be better informed in order to fight the drug problem that children are faced with today. Learn facts on the dangers of drugs; learn how to protect children from illegal drug use, etc. Once parents are informed they are better able to sit down with their children and talk about the illegal drug problem.
  • Discuss Dangers of Drugs Early – While children are young give straight facts on drugs and tell them how to steer clear. By the time kids are in middle school, peer pressure to use drugs may already be strong.
  • Look For Signs – It’s not easy to tell if your child is using drugs, but there are signs to watch for. Look for changes in behavior and changes in physical appearances. For example: acting more secretive or irritable; less motivated; spending time with a new group of friends (and not talking about them); less able to think fast; increased appetite; and declining performance at school.
  • Be Firm – Spot it! Stop it! If your son/daughter is using drugs, tell him/her that you cannot allow them to continue to use drugs. Discuss the physical and mental dangers of illegal drugs. Try to find ways that you can help him/her resist pressure to use drugs. Be persistent in efforts to keep kids drug free.
  • Seek Help – If the problem is too much for you, do not be afraid to seek help . There are provincial or local drug or alcohol abuse organizations that will help you to cope with a drug problem. Work together with other concerned parents in the community.

Parent Trap

Posted on in Information for Parents

PASAGE

Saint John

Parent Trap

Parenting is the most rewarding and challenging undertaking of a lifetime. Each stage of the parent child relationship has its pains and pleasures. One of the most complex stages in parenting is during the time that children are becoming adults, the TEEN years.

I once heard adolescence described as the time when children want all the privileges of adulthood without any of the responsibilities. One day they assert their independence and challenge the limits. Then next they turn to their parents to handle a problem that was theirs in the making.

This roller coaster of emotions and behavior is enough to send the whole family into a tailspin. It is at this time that parents need to be able to make rational choices about their responses to their child’s behavior.

Encouragement

This means identifying your teen’s strengths and nurturing them. It seems natural to point out trouble spots and correct them but the most powerful tool by far is that of encouragement. Your teen has strengths and abilities and as a parent, you are proud of those qualities.

Limits and Choices

“You cannot make anybody do anything they do not want to do!” That’s true. You cannot control your teen but you do have influence on the quality of your relationship. Part of the teen experience is testing the limits and pushing for more independence and freedom. Smart parents understand that if they do not grant more freedom, teens will often take it anyway, either defiantly or deviously. The trick is to provide choices with limits. Slowly and consistently widening the limits so that the teens have opportunity to prove themselves responsible and earn more freedom, which will encourage them to respect the limits that are set.

Teach Responsibility

Natural/Logical Consequences – for every choice we make in life there is a consequence. The role of the parent is not to control the teen’s behavior but to work together with the teen to agree on guidelines for the relationship and what will happen if those guidelines are broken.

There is no guarantee the guidelines will never be broken. The point is that the teen will learn that there is a consequence for every choice.

Points to remember:

  • Make sure the consequence makes sense or is directly connected to the behavior.
  • Involve your teen in helping to set the consequence ahead of time.
  • Be as specific as possible so there is no room for misunderstanding.
  • Set consequences that are enforceable.
  • Avoid lecturing.
  • Do not set consequences out of hurt or anger.

When Tempers Flare

Teens today are much more vocal then ever. They say what they think and expect to be listened to. The role of the parent in this situation is to help teens express themselves in ways that are respectful to others. Often this assertiveness is perceived as disrespectful and tempers flare on both sides. It is the goal of the parent in these situations to help everybody stay calm. It is the parent’s role to model behavior that will teach the teen to get calm when they are upset.

Self Care

In any relationship we operate on an emotional bank account. Often we make deposits when we have good times by showing affection or sharing memories. These are the things that carry us throughout the difficult times. We make enough deposits so that we can draw on the emotional bank account and hang in for the long haul. The trick is for parents to make sure that there are other people or things in their lives that can help them make lots of deposits.

Conclusion

Adolescence is a time of turbulence and upheaval for your teen. It does not have to be for you. Learning how to care for yourself can give you the strength you need for all the roles required of you as a parent.

Lynn Jones, RSW.

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Signs of Drug Use

Posted on in Information for Parents

PASAGE

Saint John

Signs of drug use

  • Sudden drop or gradual lowering in grades and achievement levels (reasons unclear).
  • Skipping classes or entire days of school.
  • Frequent suspensions/expulsions.
  • Present in classroom but inattentive.
  • Change in friends and reluctance to introduce them to family.
  • Drop out of sports or other extra-curricular activities.
  • Disrespect/defiance towards authority figures (parents, teachers, police), rules and regulations.

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Making Sense Of It All

Posted on in Information for Parents

PASAGE

Saint John

Making sense of it all

People of all ages, young and old, may benefit from knowledge about drugs to help make educated decisions. It is important to know about the different kinds of drugs that exist, understand how and why they may be used, their effects, and where possible problems can occur.

Below are some important points to consider when regarding drugs and their use:

  • Drugs can be used in ways that threaten the health and social well being of the individual and/or others.
  • Drugs most commonly abused are those that change or affect how a person thinks, feels, or acts. They are often referred to as mood-changing or psychoactive drugs. They include alcohol, all common street drugs, and medications used to relieve pain, calm nervousness and aid sleep.
  • Mood-changing drugs can be used over and over again to change how a person feels. Repeated use can lead to addiction and dependency. Eventually the drug can control a person’s life.
  • Using drugs that affect how a person thinks can be dangerous and/or problematic in situations that require concentration. Driving a vehicle or operating heavy machinery while under the influence can be fatal for the user and those around them. Sport and school performances may decline.
  • The greater the amount, and the more often the drug is used, the greater the risk of having a problem. For instance, an occasional drink may be harmless for most people; however, frequent binges may lead to addiction and health problems. Some people make the mistake of thinking that if a particular medication resulted in them feeling better, taking more than the recommended dose will make them feel even better. It is important to understand that drugs can be harmful if taken inappropriately.
  • The user’s drug problem will probably become more serious with time. Continued use may result in addiction, irreversible health problems (liver damage), or social problems (loss of friends and job).
  • Risks associated with drug use may increase if using more than one drug at a time. This may involve mixing medication and/or alcohol and street drugs. The combined effects of drugs are often not known and could be more potent than expected.
  • The effects of drugs may vary from person to person. For instance, alcohol could transform one individual into a ‘violent drunk’ while another person could be a ‘happy drunk’. Individual reactions to drugs may depend on physiological and biological body makeup (body size, weight, and metabolism), as well as psychological makeup (happy or angry, cautious or careless, self confident or low self esteem, healthy or mentally ill). All the above factors come into play when someone uses drugs and must be considered. It is impossible to tell how each individual is going to react.

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Guidelines for Drug Decisions

Posted on in Information for Parents

PASAGE

Saint John

Guidelines for Drug Decisions

Remember that all drugs have possible risk – even ones we take for granted. Aim to avoid these drug risks. Access reliable information about drugs before considering using them. Consult pharmacists, doctors, and unbiased written literature. When you need to be sharp and alert, avoid taking more than one drug at a time without consulting a doctor or pharmacist. Read thoroughly all directions regarding a medication provided by the pharmacist. Don’t expect drugs to solve problems or make you a better person.

Laws and rules regarding drugs must be considered. Certain drugs are illegal for everyone (eg: cocaine, LSD). Some drugs, such as alcohol and cigarettes are legal, depending on the age of the user. In some cases marijuana may also be considered a legal drug, if used for medical reasons and prescribed by a doctor. While other drugs, such as the caffeine found in coffee and colas have no legal restrictions.

Laws and rules regarding drug use may guide and individual’s school and/or work place. These rules may differ from laws enforced by the legal system. For instance, even though alcohol is legal for individuals nineteen and over, most work environments will not tolerate drinking on the job and could lead to termination.

Individual families will have different feelings about what is OK and not OK. These laws, rules, and family standards have consequences that must be discussed and considered carefully. For instance, some families feel that it is OK to allow all family members (including children) to have a glass of wine on special occasions.

Things to talk about

Below are some questions you can discuss with friends and family:

  • In what cases are the use of the following drugs OK and not OK? Medication, Alcohol, Caffeine.
  • What is the difference between drug use that is dangerous to your health and drug use, which is not dangerous?
  • Why do adults and youth use and/or abuse alcohol?
  • Why might a teenager try alcohol, cigarettes, or marijuana? Why might a teenager continue to use one of these drugs? Why might a teenager decide to stop using?
  • Discuss possible ways a person can avoid driving with someone under the influence.
  • How can a person gracefully decline drugs when it is offered to them?

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How To Choose A Role Model

Posted on in Information for Teens

PASAGE

Saint John

How To Choose A Role Model

A teen’s personal view on choosing a role model

Do you feel like you are going through a period in your life where you are trying to figure out who you really are, or who you want to become? Or are you at the age where you try to become someone else, simply to impress others? This is a normal stage for teens and preteens to be going through. You are searching for your true identity and looking to others for direction and guidance. It is during this time in your life when you are seeking out potential role models, whether it be your parents, teachers, movie stars, singers, or star athletes.

Walk into any teenager’s room and you are likely to come across posters of teen idols wearing too much makeup and too little clothing. If this sounds like a familiar sight when you walk into your own bedroom, you’re not alone. Your walls are likely plastered with posters of singers like Taylor Swift, Jay-Z, Lady Gaga, or the Jonas Brothers. Or maybe you are interested in sports celebrities such as Kobe Bryant, Anna Kournikova, Sidney Crosby, or Lisa Leslie. No matter who it is you look up to, these individuals act as role models for many youngsters around the world. Their actions, beliefs, values, and fashion sense are imitated by millions, as teens want to act like, dress like, and be like their idols.

So what exactly is a role model anyway? A role model can be any person who is looked up to and imitated by others. A good role model would have high moral standards, good family values, and act and behave appropriately. Someone with that confident, independent, “I’m in control of my own life” vibe. Another important feature we look for in a role model is someone who is hard working. Pop star Taylor Swift is a great example of what a celebrity role model should be like. She expresses her belief that she has a sense of responsibility to her fans, she expresses what she loves and how she feels, and she does not wear extremely suggestive clothing, as many celebs often do.

It’s easy to create a list of characteristics that would be great for a role model to possess, but no one is perfect. With all the new up-and-coming celebrities competing to be recognized, the positive qualities a role model may hold are often abandoned in favor of the sexy, rebellious and standout behaviours that grab your attention and influence you the most. So what kind of images and ideas are today’s hottest celebrities representing to teenagers? What are your celebrity role model’s good and bad qualities, and is his or her overall image going to help you, or hurt you?

While singer Brittany Spears may be a great entertainer, she may not be the best choice for a role model. Although Spears is a sweet and caring person, her unpredictable behavior and revealing style of dress is often an issue, as many young and preteen girls idolize her, wanting to dress, act, and be just like her. Overall, this pop star has both positive and negative role model qualities, but when she is up on stage wearing next to no clothing it is rather difficult to recall her innocent childhood ambitions. A great deal of attention is given to celebrities as they live their lives in the spotlight. Because of this they must realize that they have a responsibility to the public and act accordingly, as they are role models to many youth. The purpose of identifying a celebrity’s positive or negative traits is simply to be aware. If we see the negative images a celebrity displays we can avoid being influenced by them. Instead, we can recognize the good qualities of people, which are going to help us become a better person in a positive way. As non-celebrities, we also need to be aware of our own actions as someone, such as a little brother or sister, or maybe a younger cousin, could be looking up to us, whether we know it or not.

How To Choose A Good Role Model?

  • Pick someone who is kind, has high morals and values, and is a good person.
  • A friendly and knowledgeable person is also a good choice for a role model.
  • Not only celebrities can be role models. Often the best role models are those standing right in front of you. Example: friends, family, teachers, etc.
  • Those who are involved in your daily life will have the most profound impact on you, therefore they may be the best role model for you.
  • Don’t let peer pressure, the media, or TV exposure force you to look, act, or dress in a certain way.

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What Could Happen

Posted on in Information for Teens

PASAGE

Saint John

What could happen

Stories From Those Who Have Been There

“Say No … Say It Proudly”

“Why are you hanging out with that crowd? They are nothing but trouble.” “I am just saying this because I love you and I am worried about you.” How bad does that drive us crazy, hearing our parents nagging on us, for no reason in our eyes? It is a major pain in the butt, trust me, I know. I went through it and I thought that they were wrong and crazy. Then, when I was left with nothing, I wished I had listened to my mother when she was being crazy and saying all those silly things to me. This is my story of pain, hardship and of me not listening to the people who actually loved me for me!

I had the best life. Just my mom and me. I was doing well in school, had a lot of friends, and I was doing what I loved most: dancing. I was 11 when I got introduced to my first boyfriend and when I smoked my first joint. I didn’t know much about anything bad, especially pot. I had my first boyfriend and I wanted to fit in with his crowd, so I started smoking pot. After I smoked my first joint I felt a little funny, but I thought I could handle it. I slowly started to smoke more and more pot and I started smoking cigarettes as well because I wanted that feeling of acceptance from my boyfriend and his “cool” friends. I got just that in following and doing what they did. The first time I got caught was by my mom. I couldn’t tell her the truth, so that’s when the lying started. Time went on and I was smoking pot everyday. I started to skip classes and went to dance class less and less and the lying got worse. Now I had to lie to get money so I could get my drug fix and cigarettes for the day. After smoking pot everyday I wasn’t getting the high I used to. I got mad because my mom stopped giving me money because she was catching on. I had to lie and steal to get high, and even that wasn’t working. I thought to myself that it was time to go higher on the chain of drugs.

I got introduced to LSD (Acid), Ecstasy (E), Mushrooms (Shrooms) and Percocet (Perks). I thought that it couldn’t get any better. I was living in my own little world and I felt like nothing could go wrong. Buy, was I wrong. My boyfriend, of a little over 4 years, started abusing me mentally and emotionally. Every now and then he would push me around because I was not getting money from family members because they did not want to feed my drug addiction. So I left him and moved on to my next crowd of druggies. That’s when I met another crew of people and my new boyfriend who was so much better, I thought. I was 16 and living “the high life”. I was partying all the time and getting so high I couldn’t see straight or even walk and talk properly. Drugs were taking over my life and I let it happen. I no longer had any of my family or old friends anymore. They were tired of the choices I was making and they did not want to talk to me anymore. I did not care about school or dancing , all I cared about was when I was going to get my next fix so I could stay high 24/7. I did that for about 5 years of my teenage life. I was living a life of crime and addiction. You think the friends you have really care about you. In reality, all they care about is the same thing you do, someone to get high with or to do your drugs when they don’t have any of their own. To top everything off, I was 16 when I found out I was pregnant! Yeah that’s right, 16 and going to have a baby. I was too high all the time to worry about a baby. So I continued on with my habit and kept doing drugs. One day my best friend came to me in tears. She told me that she was 3 and a half months pregnant and had a miscarriage. Her doctors told her it was due to the amount of drugs she was putting into her system. I was speechless and I did not know what to do or what to think. I sat for 2 hours and did nothing, took one last long haul off a joint, stood up and walked out the door without saying a word. I kept walking for 3 hours. It was time for me to do something and now.

I decided to keep my baby and to continue with the pregnancy. I went back to school and completed my GED. I delivered a beautiful, healthy baby girl. All of this was possible because I dropped drugs and the losers that came along with them on the ride I was on for 5 years of my life. I could not handle it anymore. I was sick and tired of spending my money on a high that only lasted for a couple of minutes. I was tired of waking up and not knowing where I was. And I was tired of feeling like shit because I had not eaten because I was too worried about getting high. The thing I was tired of most was realizing how much I hurt my family in making them watch what I was doing to myself and fighting with my mom over who was wrong and right. All they were doing was looking out for me because I was not able to do it myself. I chose to be addicted to drugs, it did not happen by itself. It is not something that just happens, you make it happen by picking up that first pill, joint, pipe, etc… So, take my past experience and soak it in and please don’t pick it up. It is not a life you want to live. It is a life of pain, lying, hardship, and hurting the people that love you the most. So the next time that your mom or dad does not want you to go somewhere or has something to say, take a second and think to yourself. Are they driving you crazy or are they just doing their job and looking out for you? 99.9 % of the time they are looking out for the person they love the most.

Sincerely, Someone who did it…So can you!!!

“Walk Away … Keep Walking … Don’t Look Back”

I started to use pot when I was eight years old. When I started to use, it was because I wanted to be accepted by my older sister. After time went on I wasn’t getting high from pot anymore. This made me use higher drugs such as — E, Mushrooms, Coke and so on and so forth. When I was on pot it would make me act stupid. I was always hungry & I was always lazy. I spent all of my money on drugs and started to sell off all of my stuff. After I ran out of stuff to sell and my parents stopped giving me money, I started to steal. I started to loose my family and burned their trust for me. I was moving in and out of my house and ran away a lot. The first time I ran away I was thirteen years old, no one knew where I was and I thought that no one cared. When I went back to where I was living before I had ran away everyone was so happy to see me and never wanted me to do anything like that ever again. I think it was then I realized how much I was hurting my family. After awhile I would use drugs because I had so much hurt inside of me that I didn’t want to deal with it. I was always picked on a school and at home. I was abused my whole life and didn’t ever think about all of that stuff. I used drugs to escape my reality. The more I used the worse I got, I am sixteen years old and have been in an out of jail since I was young and now I have a criminal record and I am now in rehab.

Don’t say “Well I only smoke pot”, that’s what I said at first and look where I’m at now.

My second chance …

Last year I was given an opportunity through the courts to be rehabilitated. If I had not, I would have spent many long months in jail and that really didn’t appeal to me much. I accepted the offer with a pessimistic attitude only because it would clear my criminal record (not for myself). I arrived at Portage on November 18th 2009. The program was very complex and difficult to adapt to but, in contrast it gave me many opportunities to reevaluate my approach to many things . At first imagining myself 4-6 months down the road (the usual length of the program) was extremely difficult for me to do. Now, prior to this new experience, The things I would value and, incorporate persistence and determination with, were ultimately what got me facing charges. Immediately upon arrival I was perceived as a judgmental and aggressive individual to the staff there but, I seemed to fit right in with the guys. Now portage may brag about there success rate but it’s ultimately up to the addict to change they’re ways. I often felt manipulated by the staff there and my defensive personality was frequently challenged. I just couldn’t adapt to this therapeutic community run by addicts. I had to find my place. So I had to now learn how to take all my street smarts and combine them with the skills and values that fund our society. Now your probably questioning yourself as you read this; What is it really like to be rehabilitated? and for some people it’s very difficult to comprehend. It took an enormous amount of determination to complete that program and, it took me 9 months! (I had a few set backs). How I viewed myself 1 year ago, influenced me to change my ways. Its very humbling to make a self-inventory of your short-comings and, its extremely rewarding to rise above it all. I was blindly, going in the wrong direction and was inconsiderately dragging others down with me. The old me, has made me much more aware of where I was going and who I would have become. I had such a persuasive effect on those around me and it evidently, affected those I would corrupt. The main thing some addicts need to be aware of is that they’re actions may affect others and, They’re are long-term consequences to these actions. I speak with integrity when I elaborate on this topic and I I feel extremely grateful and fortunate to have been given an opportunity like this but, I’ve really only got myself to thank, for it was my choice in the beginning, right?

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The Risks of Drug Abuse

Posted on in Information for Teens

PASAGE

Saint John

The Risks of Drug Abuse

Definition:

Drugs can be considered harmful when their level of use causes physical, mental, social or economic problems. But even when used under medical guidance, some drugs can have undesirable side effects. Many drugs may also have effects beyond those for which the user is looking. When such drugs are used non-medically, these side effects become potentially dangerous.

Safety Hazards:

All psychoactive drugs can reduce physical co-ordination, distort the senses, or impair judgment. These effects can lead to serious safety risks, especially if the user drives a motor vehicle or operates machinery. Drivers intoxicated by alcohol or some other drug can cause many road injuries and fatalities. Often people who have taken alcohol or drugs are unaware of their impairment, which makes the risk all that much greater.

Physical Health Hazards:

All psychoactive drugs have effects other than those for which they are used, and some of these can be very damaging to physical health. Smoking marijuana or tobacco, for example can cause lung damage. Sniffing cocaine can damage the inside of the nose. Users who inject drugs by hypodermic needles can get infections such as serum hepatitis or AIDS. Mental Health Hazards: Some drugs can cause short-term confusion, anxiety or even severe mental disturbances caused by “Bad trips”. In the longer term, drug abuse can result in personality disturbances, learning problems, and loss of memory. Mental health risks are especially high for young drug users. A young person who turns to drugs as a way of avoiding normal anxiety and depression may be establishing a pattern of behavior that can be hard to break in the future.

Physical Dependence:

This occurs when a drug users body becomes so accustomed to a particular drug that it can only function normally if the drug is present. Without the drug the user may experience a variety of symptoms, some of which can be fatal, that are collectively referred to as “withdrawal”. Not all drugs produce physical dependence, but they may still be abused because of their perceived effects, and as a result of psychological dependence. Physical dependence is one of the factors contributing to the continued use of drugs.

Psychological Dependence:

This dependence exists when a drug is so central to a persons thoughts, emotions, and activities that it is extremely difficult to stop using it, or even stop thinking about it. Like physical dependence, psychological dependence is a cause of continued drug use.

Tolerance:

Tolerance means that, over time and with regular use, a user needs more and more of a drug to get the same effect. Tolerance increases the physical health hazards of any drug simply because it can result in increased drug use over time. Tolerance also increases the risk of a dangerous or fatal overdose, for two reasons:

  1. With some drugs, the body does not necessarily develop tolerance to all the effects of the drug to the same extent. Long-term barbiturate users for instance become tolerant to the mood altering effect of the drug, but less tolerant to its depressant effect on respiration. When this happens, the dose required to achieve this effect may be dangerously close to the lethal dose.
  2. If a drug user has not taken the drug in a long time, the expected tolerance may actually have decreased. So, after a long period of abstinence, the size of the dose the user had previously become accustomed to may actually be enough to cause an overdose.

Overdose:

An overdose of any drug is a dose that can cause serious and sudden physical or mental damage. An overdose may or may not be fatal, depending on the drug and the amount taken. Dangerous overdoses may occur in users who have developed a tolerance for a drug, or in any street drug users who have no way of knowing the exact potency of what they are buying.

Street Drug Hazards:

Illegal street drugs have a set of risks all their own.

  • Users of street drugs can never know exactly what they are taking.
  • Dealers may not know (or reveal) exactly what they are selling.
  • Some drugs are laced with other drugs or chemicals, which can be harmful. Often one drug is sold in the place of another. Research and testing of street drugs has revealed that two thirds of the drugs that were bought turned out not to be what the purchaser was buying, therefore you don’t know what you are buying over half the time. Many bad drug reactions, including fatal overdoses, are caused by the user’s ignorance of exactly what drug and how much of it they are taking.

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Definition of Drug Abuse

Posted on in Information for Teens

PASAGE

Saint John

Definition of drug abuse

Teens

Today, you, as a teen, have more problems to face, but do you know where to turn when you or a friend needs help? Take the time to read through these pages, it may give you the information you need to make decisions in a responsible manner. If we have the freedom to make our own choices we need to do so wisely.

Definition of Drug Abuse

Drug abuse may be defined as any use of a drug that leads to problems (apart from the undesirable side effects sometimes experienced by particular medical drugs). Problems may include health (illness, damage to organs, addiction), emotional (depression), social (loss of friends), family, financial (loss of job, cost of drugs), and legal (stealing for drug money).

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